Girl Walk All Day party in Portland

Sara and I are huge fans of Girl Talk’s ALL DAY. When we found out about the GIRL WALK/ALL DAY video project, we fell in love and watched it over and over. The director Jacob Krupnick has been traveling across the country putting on live screenings with dance parties. Tonight they came to Portland, and I had to attend.

I’m pretty sure I was the oldest person in the room- certainly the oldest person dancing. (And if this picture is to be believed, I was also the tallest.) Of course I pulled out my sketchbook. It’s never easy nailing the gestures of dancers- they aren’t exactly holding still- but if you stare hard enough, you can spot some patterns (and creep a few people out while you’re at it.) The picture below assembles some of the night’s more intelligible doodles. I had a great time. Big, big thanks to everyone involved.

Gesture drawings by Steve Lieber

Thunderbolts/ Luke Cage pinup for Periscope’s weekly challenge

Periscope Studio has started up a weekly(?) art challenge on our tumblr site. This week is sketches of Marvel Comics’ Thunderbolts in its current mode as written by Jeff Parker. I decided to go for a big shot of the group’s leader, Luke Cage, calmly explaining something to a robot. Click the image to embiggenize.

The original art is available at the Periscope Etsy store.

Recent sketches

Between tabling at conventions, sitting in waiting rooms, and hanging out with visiting cartoonist friends, I’ve finally had the chance to finish some pieces for the Periscope Studio Etsy store. By the time you read this, some of these will probably be sold, but you can follow the link to see which ones are left, and wince at the lunatic self-regard implicit in the pricing. While you’re there, take a look at what other studio members have contributed!

Commissioned sketch: The Shadow.

This was fun. I’ve never drawn The Shadow professionally, but I’ve doodled him quite a bit. It’d be hard to overestimate the impact the Shadow comics published by DC in the 70s had on me. They had an impossibly great line-up of illustrators- Mike Kaluta, Bernie Wrightson, Frank Robbins and E.R. Cruz- and the stories were so much darker, moodier and more brutal than the other comics I was reading at the time. They filled my head with wild notions of the possibilities of pulp melodrama, and by featuring such a wide range of styles on the same character, help raise my awareness of the effect an individual artist’s approach could have on a story.

Black and white commissioned sketch of The Shadow. Drawn in brush and ink on bristol.

Black and white commissioned sketch of The Shadow. Drawn in brush and ink on bristol.